Category Archive : wedding photography

Personal + Career Reinvention with Jasmine Star

Chase Jarvis Photography Chase

Can you believe this show has been running for 10 YEARS! Today’s guest was one of my earliest guests, and long time friend, Jasmine Star. Jasmine is a photographer, business strategist and founder of Social Curator. If you’re an OG listener, you’ll hear some behind the scenes stories of some our collaborations, including the internet’s first ever LIVE wedding (where Jasmine taught CreativeLive’s first wedding photo class – attended by 150,000 students!) More important than reminiscing, though, we go deep on finding your voice, adopting children, homemade tortillas, dropping out and reinventing yourself in an entirely new career. Jasmine’s journey is one that many creatives can identify with, from facing difficult times, how she found her feet and her personal process of transitioning from one career to another. She articulates how to make that transition and gives us very practical advice that will add heaps of value to you. We also talk about … instagram strategy – she’s a master – and you should know all about her business socialcurator.com Mentors, leaders, and inspirations the evolution of a career, how to transition from being known / building a community as a one thing (like a wedding photographer) and re-shaping that […]

The post Personal + Career Reinvention with Jasmine Star appeared first on Chase Jarvis Photography.

Weddings – A selection of images from our #ThursdayTheme

Tea Break Tog Fiona Esposito

 

For our #ThursdayTheme last week we wanted to see your wedding images. A wedding has to be one of the most intimate and emotional days of your life so it is lovely that so many of you shared your gorgeous wedding images – thank you!

 

#FridayFoto is this stunning image from our friend Michael Carver!

 

 

Here’s what Julie had to say about Michael’s image:

“Michael is one of my favourite photographers ever. 
Not only that, he is a constant source of advice and support and inspiration in this group. I can’t count the number of times he has willingly responded (at length) to members who have asked him questions or sought help.
I know he doesn’t enter the theme to win. He enters to get involved. But how could I not choose this? And if it gives me the opportunity to thank him too – then all the better!
I don’t need to go into why this image is so awesome. It just is. Right?
Thanks Michael for being great.”

 

Please join us… ?

 

Ashling Hayes

 

Audrey Boniwell

 

Barry Robb

 

Chris Scott

 

Hannah Lamprell

 

Jacqie Monk

 

Jane Ashton

 

Jessie Swift Steimle

 

Jim Davies

 

Joanna Pabel-Gruszczynska

 

Kelly Dunn

 

Laura Elizabeth Wood

 

Laurie Pilia

 

Linki Abrie

 

Liz Stowe

 

Megan Faber

 

Michaela Strivens

 

Nikki Mih

 

Olwyn Hunter Young

 

Tiffany Hopwood

 

Vaughna Palmer

 

Pop by and request to join – you’ll love it! ?

The post Weddings – A selection of images from our #ThursdayTheme appeared first on Tea Break Tog.

Weddings – A selection of images from our #ThursdayTheme

Tea Break Tog Fiona Esposito

 

For our #ThursdayTheme last week we wanted to see your wedding images. A wedding has to be one of the most intimate and emotional days of your life so it is lovely that so many of you shared your gorgeous wedding images – thank you!

 

#FridayFoto is this stunning image from our friend Michael Carver!

 

 

Here’s what Julie had to say about Michael’s image:

“Michael is one of my favourite photographers ever. 
Not only that, he is a constant source of advice and support and inspiration in this group. I can’t count the number of times he has willingly responded (at length) to members who have asked him questions or sought help.
I know he doesn’t enter the theme to win. He enters to get involved. But how could I not choose this? And if it gives me the opportunity to thank him too – then all the better!
I don’t need to go into why this image is so awesome. It just is. Right?
Thanks Michael for being great.”

 

Please join us… ?

 

Ashling Hayes

 

Audrey Boniwell

 

Barry Robb

 

Chris Scott

 

Hannah Lamprell

 

Jacqie Monk

 

Jane Ashton

 

Jessie Swift Steimle

 

Jim Davies

 

Joanna Pabel-Gruszczynska

 

Kelly Dunn

 

Laura Elizabeth Wood

 

Laurie Pilia

 

Linki Abrie

 

Liz Stowe

 

Megan Faber

 

Michaela Strivens

 

Nikki Mih

 

Olwyn Hunter Young

 

Tiffany Hopwood

 

Vaughna Palmer

 

Pop by and request to join – you’ll love it! ?

The post Weddings – A selection of images from our #ThursdayTheme appeared first on Tea Break Tog.

How to Create Clean Compositions When Shooting Portraits

Photography Life Guest Poster

How do you create clean compositions in a messy environment? It’s a problem every wedding photographer has as bridal prep rarely just means the bride. Bridesmaids, moms and grandmas could all be getting ready in the same location. This inevitably means, for want of a better word, a messy room. Make up brushes, hair dryers, spare clothes. You name it, it will be on the floor or on the work surfaces. So how do you overcome the detritus and create beautiful photographs? In this article, we will explore three tips and tricks that you can experiment with to create clean photographs and hide unsightly objects.

original-clutter
Unwanted clutter in the scene
Canon EOS 6D + EF35mm f/1.4L USM @ 35mm, ISO 500, 1/125, f/2.8

The Phone Mirror

It’s intertwined with modern living; I rarely leave the house without my phone. In order to avoid any mid-ceremony embarrassment, I always switch it off at the start of the day. Considering how heavy a camera bag can be, streamlining your kit is beneficial, so any added kit is just dead weight. Fortunately, the mobile phone can earn its keep by acting as a reflective surface to help you clean up your compositions.

phone-mirror
Canon EOS 6D + EF35mm f/1.4L USM @ 35mm, ISO 500, 1/125, f/2.8

The above image was taken in a hotel room next to where the bride and bridesmaids were getting ready. This is a great example of how even a room empty of people can still be full of unwanted objects. The window on the right is providing the main light source. As seen on the very first image, the bed is preventing an uncluttered full length shot and the background is distracting. What to do? Using the mobile phone to reflect the dress in such a fashion eliminates the background. In this instance, the added benefit of the angle of the phone helps keep the eye in the center of the frame, placing emphasis on the dress and nothing else. Furthermore, as it is reflected light, it will naturally be darker than the subject matter, which ensures that the viewer’s eye is not distracted from the main focus of the image.

using the floor-2
Canon EOS 6D + 50mm @ 50mm, ISO 200, 1/160, f/1.8

Of course, if in doubt, use the floor as a background, expose for the highlights and convert to black and white. Instant, non-distracting background, allowing the dress to take center stage (shooting at large apertures also helps)

Lens Chimping

I first encountered this technique on Sam Hurd’s blog. Sam is incredibly innovative and is constantly developing new ways of altering and diversifying his images. What makes him even more unique, is that he gives it all away on his blog. All of his tricks and techniques are thoroughly explained and comprehensively covered. I thoroughly recommend checking it out.

lens-chimp-3
Canon EOS 6D + 50mm @ 50mm, ISO 400, 1/160, f/1.8

The Lens Chimping technique involves using a lens element to distort light, throw the background out of focus and create interesting light distortions and flares. Any convex lens element will suffice. A concave lens may also work, but I can’t say I’ve tried it. Simply hold the element in front of your lens and slightly to one side, rotate on multiple axes until you achieve a satisfactory result. I’ve found best results are achieved by focusing, recomposing and then introducing the lens to create the distortion. Otherwise, the autofocus system can get confused and end up hunting for focus. The technique can be used to distort the background or, if aimed directly at a light source, to create interesting light orbs to make the image more dynamic.

lens-chimp-1
Canon EOS 6D + EF35mm f/1.4L USM @ 35mm, ISO 500, 1/125, f/2.8

I’ve demonstrated Lens Chimping on the same dress as before. Here, we can clearly see how the lamp on the desk is rendered when viewed through the concave lens. The clutter and distractions in the background are thrown out of focus and all that’s left is an interesting distortion of the light.

lens-chimp-2
Canon EOS 6D + 50mm @ 50mm, ISO 1600, 1/60, f/1.8

My other favorite application of this technique is during the first dance. Depending on the shape of the dance floor, it can be incredibly difficult to get your lighting setup A) in a position that will look flattering and B) in a location where no guests will trip over light stands in the dark. For this reason, I often place light stands right next to the DJ booth. The caveat here though is that the DJ would typically be in the background of the shot. Using the lens chimping technique, I can blur out the DJ, achieve some cool lens flare and capture the first dance with the lighting setup I want. It does take some practice. Quickly focusing, recomposing and introducing the convex lens in one swift motion takes some getting used to. I would recommend anyone to try this at home with a family member who is willing to stand still for a while. Get it right and you’ll take some of your best first dance shots. Get it wrong and the lens element will white out the entire frame, so don’t risk it.

Freelensing

Freelensing is something of a DIY project and a much less ‘out of the box’ solution compared to the previous two techniques. The premise of freelensing is to create a much cheaper alternative to a tilt-shift lens. I use a Canon 50mm f/1.8 for freelensing, which is available for around $125. Considering that the Canon 45mm tilt-shift is much more expensive at $1,400, it is a much cheaper alternative. And if done right, there is not a substantial drop in image quality. There are a number of YouTube videos explaining how to take the rear casing off a prime lens to use for freelensing and you can this video by Sam Hurd’s, where he explains how to do it on a Nikon lens. A point to note is that you need a camera that has a live view mode. This enables the rear lens element to get close enough to the sensor to have a perceivable affect.

freelensing-4
Canon EOS 6D ISO 100, 1/250,

The principle of tilt-shift is to rotate and move the lens plane relative to the image plane. Rather than focus falling off in front and behind the subject, it can be manipulated to fall off in any direction. A more thorough explanation of the process can be found here. What we need to know for the application of this technique is that the focus fall off can help us select what portion of the background is in focus. In the context of a wedding, this is incredibly useful to help us create clean images. The biggest flaw and the hardest thing to potentially overcome, is the fact that one has no control over the aperture, unless it is an older lens with an aperture ring. Defaulting to f/1.8 is great insofar as the live view is nice and bright. However, you have to be dead certain your image is in focus. Personally, I have to wear contact lenses – otherwise it’s a no-go.

freelensing-1
Canon EOS 6D ISO 800, 1/500,

The technique works best with still objects, so I recommend choosing a point during bridal preparation where the bride will be sat still. Eyeliner and mascara application are often the best times. Start up live view and angle the lens to keep the eyes sharp and allow everything else to fall away. As you become more confident, you can increase the distance between yourself and the subject. I recommend starting close, as it takes some getting used to.

freelensing-2
Canon EOS 6D ISO 200, 1/160,

Once mastered, freelensing can be applied across a variety of shots throughout the day. Couple portraits offer the next best opportunity, as you can instruct the couple not to move. The further you pull back, the more dramatic the affects can become. I particularly like the wider shots, as the corners begin to swirl, which draws the eye into the center of the frame. Try it for yourself.

freelensing-3
Canon EOS 6D ISO 100, 1/250,

This guest post was contributed by Liam Smith, a UK-based documentary wedding photographer. Intrigued by the conceptual and the technical elements of photography, Liam also works with alternative photographic processes for his personal work, creating abstract pieces out of Lumen prints and Tintypes. His work can be found here, and on Instagram.

The post How to Create Clean Compositions When Shooting Portraits appeared first on Photography Life.

Karen & Wei Paris Pre wedding Engagement Session 2016

Welcome to J e Z a Photo Blog jezaphoto

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About Us

JeZa Photography are Destination wedding photographers based in San Francisco USA, and consist of Zabrina as the master photographer & Jeremy as the photoshop master retoucher for the team.  They are the holders of WPPI Accolade of Photographic Mastery (APM) and WPPI Accolade of Outstanding Photographic Achievement (AOPA), also a SONY Artisans of Imagery of the United States.  They are named one of the Top 50 World’s Best Destination Wedding photographer by JunebugWeddings. They’ve been featured on RangeFinder Magazine’s the best and the brightest, 30 Rising Stars of Wedding Photography in America of 2012.     In the span of three years, 2010 – 2013, they’ve accumulated accolades including six times 1st place winner and being the 1st Asian American Photographer to win two International Image of the Year awards as well as an Grand Award in Portraiture from WPPI (Wedding Portraits and Professional International), which they’ve against thousands of photographers around the world.  With over 60 international award winning photos, their work has been published on various publications including International Master Photographer Vol 1, Vanity Fair, Town & Country, Cosmo Bride, Elle, Stuff Magazine (UK) & Vogue Italia’s Photovogue.  While continuing their journey as working photographers to capture romantic images for wedding couples, JeZa has also been speaking at major photographic conventions across America (ImagingUSA, WPPI, SONY Tradeshow Floor) to train professional photographers to take their photography skills to the next level.

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