Category Archive : feedback

How to Launch Your Next Project /w Product Hunt’s Ryan Hoover

Chase Jarvis Photography Chase

Ryan Hoover is most notably known as the founder of the website that brings you all the world’s newest products and technologies, Product Hunt. He’s also a writer and founder of his new VC firm, Weekend Fund which he admits he started because he’s constantly chasing the warm fuzzy feelings he gets from helping other people. Some call him Silicon Valley’s “resident nice guy” and it won’t take you long to figure out why. Ryan sees more product launches than perhaps anyone else in the world and knows how to do it well and how to do it poorly. He shares his insights for his path of launching (and continuing to launch) Product Hunt and what he notices in the 100’s of launches that make it to his virtual doorstep, daily. In today’s episode: If you want to start something and stick with it for the long haul, scratch your own itch. Product Hunt was built out of Ryan’s own curiosity and drive to share new products with his friends. Building community>building products. Successful products are rarely built in a dark dungeon and then released to the world, perfect and ready to go viral. Before you launch anything, it’s crucial […]

How to Launch Your Next Project /w Product Hunt’s Ryan Hoover

Chase Jarvis Photography Chase

Ryan Hoover is most notably known as the founder of the website that brings you all the world’s newest products and technologies, Product Hunt. He’s also a writer and founder of his new VC firm, Weekend Fund which he admits he started because he’s constantly chasing the warm fuzzy feelings he gets from helping other people. Some call him Silicon Valley’s “resident nice guy” and it won’t take you long to figure out why. Ryan sees more product launches than perhaps anyone else in the world and knows how to do it well and how to do it poorly. He shares his insights for his path of launching (and continuing to launch) Product Hunt and what he notices in the 100’s of launches that make it to his virtual doorstep, daily. In today’s episode: If you want to start something and stick with it for the long haul, scratch your own itch. Product Hunt was built out of Ryan’s own curiosity and drive to share new products with his friends. Building community>building products. Successful products are rarely built in a dark dungeon and then released to the world, perfect and ready to go viral. Before you launch anything, it’s crucial […]

A “Lightroom Classic” Survey (and a really helpful Lightroom tip)

Lightroom Killer Tips Scott Kelby

…and if you take the survey, you get a Lightroom tip as my thank you gift (oh yeah, oh yeah!). ?

Happy Monday everybody, and greetings from Phoenix, Arizona where 250+ photographers are joining me for a full day of learning Lightroom – can’t wait to meet everybody!

After last week’s big announcements, which saw Lightroom CC renamed “Lightroom Classic” and a new program released which is now called “Lightroom CC,” I wanted to get some feedback from you guys about all this.

So, if you’d take this short 5-question multiple-choice survey, I will:

(1) Share the results directly with Adobe’s Lightroom team, and…

(2) Share an important Lightroom Classic tip at the end of the survey, just for taking it.

Here’s a link to the survey.

At the end, there’s a button that brings you right back here (well, at least that’s the plan).

Hope you all have a great Monday!

Best,

-Scott

The post A “Lightroom Classic” Survey (and a really helpful Lightroom tip) appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

Adobe Admits Lightroom is Slow, Says Speeding It Up Is Top Priority

PetaPixel Michael Zhang

If you’re a photographer who’s frustrated with Lightroom running slowly (even on a powerful computer), you’re not alone — it’s a struggle shared by many, many people who use the program. But hope may be on the horizon. Adobe has just taken the rare step of publicly admitting Lightroom’s performance issues and says fixing it is the company’s top priority.

In a blog post titled “On Lightroom Performance” and published to Lightroom Journal, Adobe Photo Product Manager Tom Hogarty writes that Adobe isn’t unaware of or ignoring Lightroom’s speed issues:

I would like to address concerns recently voiced by our community of customers around Lightroom performance, as improving performance is our current top priority. We have a history, starting with our first public beta, of working with our customers to address workflow and feature needs, and we’d like to take that same approach regarding your performance concerns. We already understand many of the current pain points around GPU, import performance, certain editing tasks and review workflows and are investing heavily in improving those areas.

Adobe also wants to hear what you think and what you’d like Lightroom to be faster at.

“Over the past year we’ve added numerous enhancements to address your performance concerns but we understand we will have a lot of work to do to meet your expectations,” Hogarty writes. “If you have feedback or would like to work with the Lightroom team on your most pressing issues, please fill out this survey.”

In the survey, Adobe is collecting usage and performance information, as well as asking each user for 3 specific performance issues they’re dealing with.

Here’s an example given: “Adjustment brush after about the 10th adjustment is slow, particularly after using a preset.”

Photographers have been grumbling about years about Lightroom performance issues, so this latest news and survey should be a welcome and encouraging development after such a long period of radio silence from Adobe.

The US Copyright Office Wants to Hear Your Thoughts on ‘Moral Rights’

PetaPixel Michael Zhang

The US Copyright Office is currently doing a study on the “Moral Rights of Attribution and Integrity.” Want to play a part in the development of US copyright law moving forward? You can weigh in and share your views on the matter.

“The term ‘moral rights’ is taken from the French phrase droit moral and generally refers to certain noneconomic rights that are considered personal to an author,” the copyright office writes. “Chief among these rights are the right of an author to be credited as the author of his or her work (the right of attribution) and the right to prevent prejudicial distortions of the work (the right of integrity). These rights have a long history in international copyright law.”

The government wants to know how current US copyright law is working with regards to these moral rights, and it’s trying to figure out whether additional productions is needed.

Here’s the notice of inquiry with more information and questions you can respond to:

Example questions, found at the bottom of the notice, include:

“Should additional moral rights protection be considered? If so, what specific changes should be considered by Congress?”

“Would stronger protections for either the right of attribution or the right of integrity implicate the First Amendment? If so, how should they be reconciled?”

“How does, or could, technology be used to address, facilitate, or resolve challenges and problems faced by authors who want to protect the attribution and integrity of their works?”

If you’d like to share your thoughts with the copyright office, you’ll need to do so before March 30th, 2017. You can submit your comments through this page.

(via US Copyright Office via PDNPulse)


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